Last updated 1.2014

Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) Program

The Loyola University Medical Center Emergency Medical Services Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) Program is a four-month course of study based on the U.S. Department of Transportation's National EMS Education Standards (2009) and the NHTSA National EMS Scope of Practice Model (2007) for EMT Instruction. Upon successful completion of the course of studies, Loyola EMT candidates are eligible to challenge either the National Registry examination for EMTs or the Illinois Department of Public Health examination to gain their licensure as an EMT-Basic by the State of Illinois. Incorporated into each 196-hour course are 16 hours of ambulance ride time and 16 hours of clinical rotation in hospital emergency departments.

The primary focus of the EMT is to provide basic emergency medical care and transportation for critical and emergent patients who access the emergency medical system. This individual possesses the basic knowledge and skills necessary to provide patient care and transportation. EMTs function as part of a comprehensive EMS response under medical oversight. This program focuses on developing the knowledge, skills and abilities that will allow each student to properly assess and treat a variety of medical emergencies as EMTs in the prehospital setting. It is designed for individuals seeking to become healthcare providers and presents a strong foundation for those who wish to pursue advanced training at the Paramedic level.

Cardiac arrest, respiratory emergencies, shock and bleeding, trauma, emergency childbirth, fracture splinting, wound care and diabetic emergencies are some of the many situations that the LUMC EMT student will learn to respond to. Additional focus topics will include scene and personal safety issues, ambulance operations, lifting and moving techniques, basic pharmacology, and street survival for the prehospital care provider.

The EMT course requires that students be dedicated, motivated and enthusiastic about learning. They should be open to performing hands-on skills and working as a team. As prehospital healthcare providers, LUMC EMT students are educated and expected to perform their duties in a prompt and professional manner that will make them leaders in the Emergency Medical Services profession.

Prerequisites: Minimum 18 years of age; high school diploma or equivalency; Healthcare Provider level CPR certification; detailed information found in brochure.

B to P Boot Camp

B to P Boot Camp is a 40 hour course designed for EMT-Basics who wish to pursue advanced training at the Paramedic level. This informal class will include lectures, skill labs and small group activities.

Course content includes medical terminology, body systems, an introduction to pharmacology and strategies for taking exams. It will focus on establishing a firm foundation for students who want to be well prepared for the paramedic program. In addition to 24 hours in class, students will complete 16 hours of clinical time.

Paramedic Program

The Loyola University Medical Center Paramedic Program is an 11-month course of study based on the US DOT National EMS Education Standards (2009) and NHTSA National EMS Scope of Practice Model (2007) for Paramedic instruction. The Committee on Accreditation of Educational Programs for the EMS Professions (CoAEMSP), in conjunction with the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP), and the Illinois Department of Public Health Division of EMS and Highway Safety, has recognized and accredited the LUMC Paramedic Program since 1995. The LUMC Paramedic Program is a nationally accredited program in the State of Illinois.

This course is comprised of formal classroom instruction, a variety of clinical rotations in medical center and community hospital settings, and a comprehensive field internship. The LUMC Paramedic Program emphasizes that students demonstrate strong interpersonal skills, critical thinking abilities, good decision-making, and the capacity for making quick and appropriate judgments regarding patient care.

Upon successful completion of their course of studies, LUMC Paramedic candidates are eligible to challenge either the National Registry examination for Paramedics or the Illinois Department of Public Health examination to gain their licensure as an EMT-Paramedic in the State of Illinois. As allied health professionals, Loyola Paramedic Program graduates are taught how to interact effectively with other emergency services personnel, to be dynamic leaders, to value life-long learning and personal development, to be of service within their communities, and above all, to respect and sustain human life.

Prerequisites: Minimum 18 years of age; high school diploma or equivalency; Healthcare Provider level CPR verification; and current Illinois EMT-B licensure.

National Registry Paramedic Review Course

The National Registry Paramedic Review course provides a comprehensive review of topics included in the National Registry exam. Taught by expert paramedic instructors, physicians and nurses, this program offers paramedics the opportunity to refresh and practice their skills in a challenging and supportive environment, and to identify areas of weakness that should be studied prior to taking the exam.

Loyola EMS System and IDPH have approved 48 hours of continuing education credit for the completed course, which combined with current ACLS certification will meet the National Registry renewal requirement.

Critical Care Emergency Medical Transport Program (CCEMTP)

The Critical Care Emergency Medical Transport Program (CCEMTP) is an intensive, two and a half week program that will prepare the experienced paramedic, nurse or respiratory therapist to become a critical care transport specialist. In conjunction with the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, expert paramedics, nurses and physicians will discuss a variety of topics, including ventilators, 12-lead ECGs, IV pumps, advanced pharmacology, invasive lines, intra-aortic balloon pumps, aeromedical transport, and complications of critical care transports.

The CCEMT-P Course is open to any paramedic, nurse or respiratory therapist who has worked in that capacity for a minimum of one year. Upon successful completion, the student will receive a renewable certification from UMBC, valid for three years. In addition, 96 hours of continuing education credit will be issued for an hour-for-hour basis through the Loyola EMS System and the Illinois Department of Public Health.

Region VIII Emergency Communications Registered Nurse (ECRN) Course

The Emergency Communications Registered Nurse (ECRN) monitors Emergency Medical Services telecommunications from EMTs and Paramedics and acts as a designee of the EMS System Medical Director, to provide medical direction to prehospital personnel.

Utilizing various types of telecommunications devices, the ECRN is able to guide EMT-Basics and Paramedics through various medical emergencies, based on the Region VIII Standard Operating Procedures.

This ECRN course provides the experienced Emergency Department Registered Nurse with the necessary information to perform this extended role and prepares a candidate for the written examination as required by the Illinois Department of Public Health, Division of Emergency Medical Services & Highway Safety.

This course consists of 40 hours of didactic lecture presented over a period of five days and is supplemented with eight hours of ambulance observation time with a local EMS provider.

Prerequisites: Currently licensed RN; minimum of one year of ED nursing experience; currently recognized in ACLS; Healthcare Provider level CPR certification; have recommendation of EMS Medical Director, ED Nurse Manager, and ECRN/EMS Coordinator.

Please contact the Loyola EMS System Office for course availability.